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How to Boost Team Performance: “I Do, We Do, You Do” for an Esports Teacher

Esports has become a rapidly growing industry, with professional gamers earning millions of dollars in prize money and sponsorships. The competitiveness of esports requires players to learn and excel quickly. This is only achieved through effective training and coaching. One teaching strategy that Valor Esports has adopted from sports and education is the “I Do, We Do, You Do” teaching strategy. In this article, we’ll explore how an esports teacher can utilise this strategy to improve team performance and enhance players’ skills.

What is the “I Do, We Do, You Do” teaching strategy?

The “I Do, We Do, You Do” a teaching strategy is a structured approach that involves three stages of learning. The first stage is “I Do”, where the educator demonstrates how to perform a task or solve a problem. The second stage is “We Do”, where the esports teacher and students work together to complete the task or solve the problem. The final stage is “You Do”, where the students independently apply the skills they have learned to complete the task or solve the problem.

The “I Do, We Do, You Do” teaching strategy is based on the concept of scaffolding, where the educator provides support to help students learn and develop their skills. Scaffolding allows students to gradually build their knowledge and confidence, leading to independent learning.

A diagram of the "Gradual Release Model": an incredibly useful tool for an esports teacher.
“The Gradual Release Model”: an incredibly useful tool for an esports teacher. Source: Stacey Shubitz from Two Writing Teachers

How can the “I Do, We Do, You Do” teaching strategy be used in esports?

Esports is a team-based activity, and effective communication and teamwork are essential for success. The “I Do, We Do, You Do” teaching strategy is applied to esports in several ways, to improve team performance and enhance players’ skills.

1. Game Analysis

In the “I Do” stage, the esports teacher demonstrates how to analyze gameplay to identify strengths, weaknesses, and opportunities for improvement. The coach might use tools such as video analysis software to review gameplay and then provide feedback to players.

Next, in the “We Do” stage, the educator and team will often work together to analyze gameplay and identify areas for improvement. The coach can guide the team in identifying patterns and strategies used by opponents, and the team can brainstorm strategies to counter them.

Finally, in the “You Do” stage, the team is able to independently apply the skills they have learned to analyze gameplay and develop strategies for future games. This improves the team’s ability to adapt to different opponents and situations, thus leading to better performance.

2. Skill Training

Firstly, in the “I Do” stage, the coach demonstrates how to perform specific skills, such as aiming, movement, and decision-making. The coach explains the reasoning behind the skills, and provides examples of how they can be applied in gameplay.

Secondly, in the “We Do” stage, the coach and team work together to practice the skills in simulated game situations. Feedback is given by the coach on the team’s performance and guide them in improving their skills.

Lastly, in the “You Do” stage, the team independently practices the skills they have learned in real gameplay. This will then improve their ability to execute the skills under pressure and in different game situations.

3. Communication Training

In the “I Do” stage, the coach demonstrates how to communicate effectively with the team during gameplay. The coach explains the importance of clear and concise communication and provides examples of effective communication.

Secondly, in the “We Do” stage, the coach and team work together to practice communication skills such as callouts, timing, and strategy discussions during simulated gameplay. The coach is then able to provide feedback on the team’s communication. This will guide them in improving their communication skills and understanding what to work on next.

Then, in the “You Do” stage, the team can independently apply the communication skills they have learned in real gameplay. This will improve their ability to coordinate and work together effectively, leading to better performance.

4. Strategy Development

In the “I Do” stage, the coach can demonstrate how to develop effective strategies for different game situations. The coach can explain the reasoning behind the strategies and provide examples of how they can be applied in gameplay.

In the “We Do” stage, the coach and team can work together to develop and refine strategies. The coach can guide the team in identifying strengths and weaknesses and developing effective counter-strategies.

Finally, in the “You Do” stage, the team can independently apply the strategies they have learned in real gameplay. This will improve their ability to adapt to different opponents and situations, leading to better performance.

Benefits of Using the “I Do, We Do, You Do” Teaching Strategy in Esports

Using the “I Do, We Do, You Do” teaching strategy in esports can provide several benefits, including:

  • Improved team performance: The structured approach of “I Do, We Do, You Do” helps teams to develop their skills and work together effectively. Therefore, it leads to better results.
  • Enhanced individual skills: The focus on skill development assists players in improving their individual skills. Thus, overall team performance (particularly mechanical) is improved.
  • Better communication: The emphasis on communication in the “I Do, We Do, You Do” teaching strategy improves the team’s ability to coordinate and work together effectively.
  • Increased adaptability: The focus on strategy development in the “I Do, We Do, You Do” teaching strategy can help teams adapt to different opponents and situations, leading to better performance.

FAQs

Q: Can the “I Do, We Do, You Do” teaching strategy be used for individual training?

A: Yes, the “I Do, We Do, You Do” teaching strategy is useful for individual training as well. The esports teacher demonstrates how to perform specific skills and work with the player to practice the skills in simulated game situations. They are therefore able to encourage the player to independently apply the skills in real gameplay.

Q: How can the “I Do, We Do, You Do” teaching strategy be adapted for different games?

A: The “I Do, We Do, You Do” teaching strategy is adaptable for different games by focusing on the specific skills and strategies required for each game. The esports teacher demonstrates how to perform skills and develop effective strategies. The team will then work together to practice and apply the strategies in gameplay.

Q: How can the “I Do, We Do, You Do” teaching strategy be integrated into a team’s regular training routine?

A: The “I Do, We Do, You Do” teaching strategy is integrated into a team’s regular training routine by incorporating it into practice sessions and gameplay reviews. Moreover, the esports teacher will demonstrate specific skills and strategies during practice sessions. The team then works together to apply them in simulated gameplay. After each game, the team reviews gameplay to identify areas for improvement, thus developing effective strategies for future games.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the “I Do, We Do, You Do” teaching strategy is a valuable tool for improving team performance and enhancing players’ skills in esports. By providing a structured approach to learning, this teaching strategy helps teams develop their communication, coordination, and strategic thinking abilities. What’s more, by breaking down the learning process into three stages, players learn new skills and strategies effectively. Thus, this transfers their knowledge to real gameplay situations more efficiently.

Coaches can adapt the “I Do, We Do, You Do” teaching strategy to fit the specific needs of their teams. By focusing on skills and strategies, coaches can then develop players’ abilities and make them more effective as a team.

If you want to read more about our coaching for organisations, visit valoresports.com

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